Biodegradable Wet Wipes Recommended for Elderly and Medical Care

Surviveware Earns Product Recommendation for Elderly Care

Woodbridge, United States - January 12, 2019 /MarketersMedia/ —

Maintaining good personal hygiene of convalescing, recuperating, or elderly members of the family is as important as one’s hygiene. Without proper care, it is easy for patients or seniors to contract infections, rashes, and disease. These discomforts can be prevented by proper support, care, and hygiene.

There are many products on the market that target the needs of post-op patients and the elderly. However, some hygiene products barely address their needs and requirements. As such, hygiene problems among those who cannot shower or are bed-bound are not thoroughly solved.

Surviveware, a retailer of adventure and preparedness goods, developed a product that not only works for campers and hunters but also provides immense benefits for those in recovery or bedridden: the Surviveware Biodegradable Wet Wipes.

The company is known for creating versatile products that address the adventure needs of their customers. Their Biodegradable Wet Wipes, which are recognized as “Amazon’s Choice” in their category, are designed to provide hygiene care to hunters, hikers, campers, and have been discovered by those who are unable to shower post-op.

Surviveware’s biodegradable wet wipes are loaded with the right formulation that works well for adventurers or patients and their varying hygiene needs. Packed with a hypoallergenic and moisture-enriched formula, these wet wipes are very suitable for patients s with delicate and sensitive skin. The wet wipes’ gentle formula can remove tough dirt, caked-on mud, grime, and oil without leaving any sticky residue. This feature makes the wet wipes a pleasant alternative to showering without having to step inside the shower.

These wipes have an alcohol-free formulation that doesn’t dry or irritate any part of the body. Also, since these wipes have natural aloe and vitamin E, the skin stays supple and nourished.

The Surviveware Biodegradable Wet Wipes are economical to use. The cloth sheets are 30% larger compared to regular baby wipes. This makes it convenient to freshen an average sized person’s body with just one to two sheets. Moreover, the Biodegradable Wet Wipes comes in a pack of 32 wipes that assures users the availability of enough sheets to last a long time. These wipes won't burden seniors who travel because its package only weighs one pound.

Discover why Surviveware gained the recommendation of BuzzFeed and the approval of Amazon by ordering these amazing no-rinse bathing and shower wipes.

Skeptical about making your first purchase? Surviveware offers a foolproof Money Back Guarantee. You can return your purchase within 30 days, no questions asked!

Order the Surviveware Biodegradable Wet Wipes now by clicking here. Limited packs available!

Contact Info:
Name: Amanda Condry
Organization: Surviveware
Phone: 703-910-5188
Website: https://surviveware.com

Source URL: https://marketersmedia.com/biodegradable-wet-wipes-recommended-for-elderly-and-medical-care/469041

Source: MarketersMedia

Release ID: 469041

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